Go: Implementing Subcommands With go-flags

github.com/jessevdk/go-flags is the go-to tool for argument processing. It supports subcommands but understanding how to do it is a feat of reverse-engineering. So, here is an example.

Code:

package main

import (
    "os"

    "github.com/jessevdk/go-flags"
)

type readParameters struct {
}

type writeParameters struct {
}

type parameters struct {
    Verbose bool `short:"v" long:"verbose" description:"Display logging"`
    Read readParameters `command:"read" alias:"r" description:"Read functions"`
    Write readParameters `command:"write" alias:"w" description:"Write functions"`
}

var (
    arguments = new(parameters)
)

func main() {
    p := flags.NewParser(arguments, flags.Default)

    _, err := p.Parse()
    if err != nil {
        os.Exit(-1)
    }

    switch p.Active.Name {
    case "read":
        //...
    case "write":
        //...
    }
}

If you were to save it as "args.go", this is what the help and the usage would look like:

$ go run args.go -h
Usage:
  args [OPTIONS] 

Application Options:
  -v, --verbose  Display logging

Help Options:
  -h, --help     Show this help message

Available commands:
  read   Read functions (aliases: r)
  write  Write functions (aliases: w)

exit status 255

$ go run args.go read 
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Weather Dashboard from the CLI

It will presumably fall-back to finding the geographic area of your IP if a location is not provided/searched, though it had trouble with mine.

Terminal_691.png

Just when you think the adventure is over, you might decide to try it in the browser and discover that it can also serve HTML:

Weather report: 33301 - Google Chrome_693.png

Unfortunately, the search mechanism doesn’t work the same as it does at the command-prompt, if at all. So, I needed to provide a zip-code.

The same guy also produces a service to print QR-codes from the command-line using just the available resolution:

Terminal_694.png